History Of Taraba State From Creation To Present Day

History of Taraba State: From Creation to Present Day

Taraba State is one of the 36 states in Nigeria, located in the North-Eastern region of the country. It was created on August 27, 1991, during the military administration of General Ibrahim Babangida. The state was carved out of the defunct Gongola State and named after one of the three major rivers that flow through it.

The state is bordered by Bauchi and Gombe states to the north, Adamawa state to the east, Cameroon to the south, and Benue, Nassarawa, and Plateau states to the west. Taraba State has a land area of 59,400 square kilometers and is an amalgam of three former divisions – Wukari, Mambilla, and Muri divisions.

Taraba State is known for its diverse cultural heritage, with over 80 ethnic groups residing in the state. The state is also home to a number of tourist attractions, including the Mambilla Plateau, Gashaka-Gumti National Park, and the Kpamboi Hills. The history of Taraba State is rich and varied, with a number of significant events shaping its development over the years.

 

Geographical Setting

Location and Boundaries

Taraba State is located in the north-eastern part of Nigeria, and it is bordered by Bauchi and Gombe States to the north, Adamawa State to the east, Cameroon to the south, and Benue, Nassarawa, and Plateau States to the west. The state capital, Jalingo, is situated in the southern part of the state.

Topography and Climate

The northern part of Taraba State is characterized by a wooded savanna region drained by the Benue River and its tributaries. The southern part of the state is mountainous and hilly, with the Mambilla Plateau being the highest point in Nigeria. The climate in Taraba State is generally tropical with two distinct seasons: the rainy season, which lasts from April to October, and the dry season, which lasts from November to March.

Natural Resources

Taraba State is endowed with several natural resources, including mineral deposits such as coal, limestone, and iron ore. The state is also rich in agricultural resources, with crops such as yams, cassava, maize, and rice being grown in large quantities. The state is also known for its vast forest reserves, which provide a habitat for a variety of wildlife species such as elephants, gorillas, and chimpanzees.

In summary, Taraba State is a state in north-eastern Nigeria with a diverse topography and climate. The state is rich in natural resources, with vast agricultural and mineral resources, as well as forest reserves that are home to a variety of wildlife species.

 

Historical Overview

Taraba State, located in the North-Eastern part of Nigeria, has a rich and diverse history that spans several centuries. The state is named after the Taraba River, which flows through it and is one of the major tributaries of the River Benue. In this section, we will provide a brief overview of the history of Taraba State, with a focus on the pre-colonial era, colonial period, and post-independence developments.

Pre-Colonial Era

The pre-colonial history of Taraba State is characterized by the presence of several ethnic groups, each with its unique culture, language, and political organization. Some of the major ethnic groups in the state include the Jukun, Kuteb, Chamba, Mumuyes, Tivs, and Fulanis. These groups engaged in trade, agriculture, and hunting, and had established complex systems of governance and social organization.

Colonial Period

The colonial period in Taraba State began in the late 19th century, with the arrival of the British. The British established a protectorate over the area, and the region became part of the Northern Protectorate. The colonial authorities introduced new administrative structures and policies, which had a significant impact on the social, economic, and political landscape of the state.

Post-Independence Developments

After Nigeria gained independence in 1960, Taraba State was part of the Northern Region, which was one of the three regions in the country. In 1976, the state became part of the Gongola State, along with Adamawa State. Taraba State was carved out of the Gongola State in 1991, during the military regime of General Ibrahim Babangida.

Since its creation, Taraba State has made significant progress in various sectors, including education, healthcare, agriculture, and infrastructure. The state is home to several tertiary institutions, including the Federal University, Wukari, and the Taraba State University. The state is also known for its diverse agricultural resources, including yams, cassava, maize, and rice.

In conclusion, the history of Taraba State is a testament to the resilience and diversity of its people. The state has undergone significant transformations over the years, and its rich cultural heritage and natural resources continue to be a source of pride and development for its people.

 

Cultural Heritage

Taraba State is a state in Nigeria that is rich in cultural heritage. The state is home to over 80 different ethnic groups, each with its own unique language, customs, and traditions. The state’s cultural heritage is a reflection of its diverse population and long history.

Ethnic Groups and Languages

The ethnic groups in Taraba State include the Jukun, Kuteb, Chamba, Mumuye, Wurkum, Mambilla, Jenjo, Fulani, and many others. Each of these groups has its own language, and many of them have their own unique dialects. The majority of the people in Taraba State are farmers, and their way of life is closely tied to the land.

Traditional Festivals and Crafts

Taraba State is known for its many traditional festivals and crafts. One of the most popular festivals is the Takum and Jibu culture dance in Bali. This festival is a celebration of the harvest season and is marked by traditional music, dancing, and food. Another popular festival is the Purma of the Chamba in Donga, which is a celebration of the new yam harvest.

In addition to festivals, Taraba State is also known for its traditional crafts. The Kutebs in Takum and Ussa are known for their Kuchecheb, which is a type of pottery that is used for cooking. The Mambilla are known for their Kati, which is a type of woven cloth that is used for clothing and decoration.

Overall, Taraba State’s cultural heritage is a testament to its rich history and diverse population. The state’s many ethnic groups and traditional festivals and crafts are a reflection of the unique character of the people who call Taraba State home.

 

Modern Development

Political Structure

Taraba State is one of the 36 states in Nigeria with its capital city in Jalingo. The state is governed by an elected governor and a House of Assembly, which is responsible for making laws and overseeing the affairs of the state. The state is divided into 16 Local Government Areas (LGAs), each headed by an elected chairman.

Economy and Infrastructure

Taraba State is blessed with abundant natural resources, including fertile land, water, and mineral deposits. The state’s economy is mainly agrarian, with agriculture being the mainstay of the economy. The state is also home to several industries, including textile, food processing, and cement production.

In terms of infrastructure, Taraba State has made significant progress in recent years. The state government has invested heavily in road construction, with several new roads being built to connect different parts of the state. The state also has an airport, which serves as a gateway to the state and the northeast region of Nigeria.

Education and Health Services

Taraba State has made significant progress in the area of education and health services. The state government has invested heavily in the education sector, with several new schools being built and existing ones renovated. The state also has several tertiary institutions, including the Taraba State University, which offers courses in various fields.

In terms of health services, the state has several hospitals and health centers, which provide basic and specialized healthcare services to the people. The state government has also launched several health programs aimed at improving the health status of the people, including the immunization program, which has helped to reduce the incidence of vaccine-preventable diseases in the state.

 

Frequently Asked Questions

What is the historical background of Taraba State in Nigeria?

Taraba State was created on August 27, 1991, by the Babangida Military Administration. It was carved out of the defunct Gongola State. The state derives its name from one of the three major rivers in the region, the Taraba River. The state is located in the North-Eastern part of Nigeria and is bordered by Bauchi and Gombe states to the north, Adamawa state to the east, Cameroon to the south, and Benue, Nassarawa, and Plateau states to the west.

What are the major ethnic groups and which tribe is the majority in Taraba State?

The major ethnic groups in Taraba State are the Fulani, Mumuye, Mambilla, Jukun, Tiv, Kuteb, Wurkun, Yandang, Ndola, Itchen, Jenjo, Tigun, and Jibu. The Fulani tribe is the majority in Taraba State, followed by the Mambilla and Jukun tribes.

What are the key economic activities Taraba State is known for?

Taraba State is known for its vast agricultural resources, with crops such as yam, maize, rice, cassava, and millet being grown in large quantities. The state is also rich in mineral resources such as coal, gold, and limestone. Other economic activities in the state include livestock farming, fishing, and tourism.

How is the local government structure organized within Taraba State, and can you provide a map?

Taraba State is divided into 16 local government areas (LGAs), which are further divided into wards and districts. The LGAs are Bali, Donga, Gashaka, Gassol, Ibi, Jalingo, Karim Lamido, Kurmi, Lau, Sardauna, Takum, Ussa, Wukari, Yorro, Zing, and Ardo-Kola. A map of the local government areas can be found on the official website of the Taraba State Government.

What is the demographic distribution of religions in Taraba State?

The major religions in Taraba State are Christianity, Islam, and traditional African religions. Christianity is the most widely practiced religion in the state, followed by Islam and traditional African religions.

Who are some of the prominent figures or the richest individuals in Taraba State?

There are several prominent figures and wealthy individuals in Taraba State, including politicians, businessmen, and traditional rulers. However, it is not appropriate to name individuals without adequate research and verification.

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